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Chief Investment Officer & Senior Vice President of Reignwood Industries Executive MBA, University of Cambridge

Jiaqi Nie
Chief Investment Officer & Senior Vice President of Reignwood Industries Executive MBA, University of Cambridge
Huron taught me to think from various cultural viewpoints and fostered my ability to think analytically and share my perspectives in persuasive ways.

Jiaqi Nie
Chief Investment Officer & Senior Vice President of Reignwood Industries
Executive MBA, University of Cambridge

Jiaqi’s Huron story began in 2001 when a full scholarship enabled him to take advantage of an exchange program at the prestigious Liberal Arts university. Jiaqi had never left China before, and he brought with him only $700 – for the entire year!

So, how did a starving student work up to leading roles within the US government and a Fortune 500 company in China? He welcomed the challenges he was faced with and ensured they shaped, rather than defeated his entrepreneurial spirit. Jiaqi also developed his capacity for Leadership with Heart by fully engaging with the unique benefits of studying the social sciences.

“Huron taught me to think from various cultural viewpoints and fostered my ability to think analytically and share my perspectives in persuasive ways,” Jiaqi shares. “Studying there was a turning point for me: it opened up my mind and provided me with a global vision, which gave me the confidence to establish the bridge between China and the Western world.”

Jiaqi’s current roles demand he has the critical cultural awareness to make difficult decisions that may have international consequences, and he believes his background in Liberal Arts plays a very important role in his ability to do this effectively.  “Huron changed my life completely and I am very grateful,” he says. “I was always impressed by the small classes and the great personal attention from the faculty and staff, and I feel a very strong connection to the school – even 17 years later.”